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[S7E7] The One With Ross's Library Book



The One With Ross' Library BookSeason 7, episode 7153rd overall episode of FriendsRoss' library book.Episode InformationAir dateNovember 16, 2000Written byScott SilveriDirected byDavid SchwimmerEpisode GuidePreviousThe One With The Nap PartnersNextThe One Where Chandler Doesn't Like Dogs




[S7E7] The One With Ross's Library Book


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Ross' doctoral dissertation can be found at the library but when he goes to see it he finds out that the Paleontology section of the library is only used by students to make out or fool around; therefore Ross decides to defend the area. However, after meeting an attractive paleontologist in the area, he is caught fooling around with her by library security.


Rachel and Phoebe convince Joey to keep dating a girl that they like. However, the girls must decide whether to tell Joey when they find out that she's not interested in a serious relationship with him. Monica unintentionally invites Janice to her wedding. Ross is proud to find his thesis in the library but gets upset when he discovers it is in a section that is so deserted that students go there to make out.


Ross discovers that his dissertation is in a section of the library where students go to have sex. Chandler's ex-girlfriend Janice manipulates Monica and Chandler into inviting her the wedding. Rachel and Phoebe meddle in Joey's relationship with Erin.


Ross is pleased that his dissertation is in the school library, until he finds out it's in an area of the library where people go to make out. Meanwhile, Rachel and Phoebe try get Joey to consider a longer-term relationship with a woman he hooked up with, and Janice invites herself to Chandler and Monica's wedding.


Ross: Let me ask you something. At your school, was there a place on campus where students went to fool around?Rachel: Yeah, there was. In the corner of the library where all these dusty books were that nobody ever read- Yes, there was.


Mantel's first novel, 1985's "Every Day Is Mother's Day," drew on her experience working as a social worker in a geriatric hospital. She returned to the characters with "Vacant Possession." She would regularly publish for nearly 25 years, earning critical praise but only modest commercial success, with such books as "Eight Months on Ghazzah Street" (inspired by her move with her geologist husband to Saudi Arabia), "Fludd," "A Place of Greater Safety" (about the French Revolution), "A Change of Climate" (about missionaries in Africa), "An Experiment in Love," "The Giant," and "Beyond Black" (about a psychic medium). She also published short story collections and a memoir, "Giving Up the Ghost."


Other books included "Long March, Short Spring: The Student Uprising at Home and Abroad" (written with her then-husband, John Ehrenreich); "Fear of Falling: The Inner Life of the Middle Class"; "The Worst Years of Our Lives: Irreverent Notes from a Decade of Greed"; "This Land is Their Land: Reports from a Divided Nation"; "Blood Rites: Origins and History of the Passions of War"; "Living with a Wild God: A Nonbeliever's Search for the Truth about Everything"; and "Natural Causes: An Epidemic of Wellness, the Certainty of Dying, and Killing Ourselves to Live Longer."


At 17 she began therapy for having experienced "a lot of death, and a lot of abuse and homelessness," she told the Associated Press. "I went through eight years of trying to be at peace with who I was and what had happened to me as a child." In her book she described developing a separate personality due to her suffering.


Ivana later penned a pair of roman à clef romance novels, "For Love Alone" and "Free to Love"; wrote a self-help book, "The Best Is Yet to Come: Coping with Divorce and Enjoying Life Again," and an advice column; offered lectures titled "Women Who Dare"; and attached her name to a cornucopia of products, from clothes to jewelry and perfume.


British composer Monty Norman (April 4, 1928-July 11, 2022) performed in big bands, wrote songs for British rockers Cliff Richard and Tommy Steele, helped create several stage musicals (including "Make Me an Offer," "Expresso Bongo," "Irma la Douce," "The Moony Shapiro Songbook" and "Poppy"), and even shared the stage with comic Benny Hill. But it was his theme song for a British secret service agent with a license to kill that proved transcendent. 041b061a72


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